Historic Homes Tour Bonus: Janell Prussman's 1950 Airstream

Historic Homes Tour Bonus: Janell Prussman's 1950 Airstream

In 1957, President Eisenhower created the American Interstate Highway System, and the Prussman’s trailer almost certainly got it’s wings on those newly minted routes! The Flying cloud has been restored inside and out for tailgating and small parties, and is decorated with an eye to the era it came from.

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Historic Homes Feature: Love and an Eye for Midcentury Detail

Historic Homes Feature: Love and an Eye for Midcentury Detail

While simple on the outside, the inside is filled with original classic mid-century details that will delight fans of the era. The living room has a three-sided fireplace, complete with original brass sconces. The kitchen has been remodeled but the current owners kept the lighting fixtures and the functioning Nutone intercom system with radio. Many of the toggle switches throughout the home are original.

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Historic Homes Feature: a 1908 American Foursquare Gets a Refresh

Historic Homes Feature: a 1908 American Foursquare Gets a Refresh

Built around 1908, this two-story foursquare home with colonial revival elements reflects a post-Victorian style popular in this East Elizabeth neighborhood. A classical portico at the main entry includes Tuscan columns supporting a formal cornice with a dentil band. The front of the home also features a large twenty-light picture window, complimented by a series of large double hung windows with stepped molding lintels.This wooden clapboard home has a bellcast hipped roof with wide overhanging boxed eaves; the detached garage, a newer addition, is side-gabled with a symmetrically sloped roof. A one-story addition expands the home’s east side.

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Historic Homes Feature: An American Foursquare's Colorful Evolution

Historic Homes Feature: An American Foursquare's Colorful Evolution

The home was built between 1903 and 1907 for prominent local farmer and stockman Edward Littler, his wife Sarah, and their children. This American Foursquare may have been a kit home as evidenced by stenciled numbers on the rafters, located during the home’s restoration

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Historic Homes Feature: A Brick Victorian by Rail

Historic Homes Feature: A Brick Victorian by Rail

A striking example of successful renovation and expansion of an historic residence, this house was built in 1898. According to unsubstantiated local lore, this brick home, along with others in the same block, was built in Wyoming and later moved to Fort Collins by rail. City documents indicate that after serving as the residence for a number of short-term occupants in the 1910s and 20s, the house was purchased by Murtie Belian, the wife of a retired Methodist minister.

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Historic Homes Feature: Rescuing a Rare Colorado Italianate

Historic Homes Feature: Rescuing a Rare Colorado Italianate

The HC Howard house at 145 North Loomis offers a rare example of the Italianate style in Fort Collins. Built sometime between 1888 and 1895, it has two stories; a shallow roofline; pairs of tall slender windows; and a detailed porch and false balcony. The interior retains many original features, including an ornate fireplace in the parlor, elaborate wood windows, and baseboards. Interior photos from the George Avery family in the 1890s show Victorian furniture and heavy draperies.

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Historic Homes Feature: Modern Elegance & Victorian Charm in a Local Landmark

Historic Homes Feature: Modern Elegance & Victorian Charm in a Local Landmark

The Edwards House was built in 1904 for Alfred Augustus Edwards at a cost of $6,000. Alfred was involved in irrigation and served as president of the State Board of Agriculture, Larimer County treasurer, and city alderman. In 1883, Alfred married Phoebe Edson, the sister of Sarah Avery, and they had three children, James, Walter, and Ruth. Sarah’s husband, Franklin Avery, built the Avery House, which is directly to the east of the Edwards House.

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Historic Homes Feature: Thoughtfully Updating a Minimal Traditional

Historic Homes Feature: Thoughtfully Updating a Minimal Traditional

The house at 612 Sycamore Street was one of many homes being built across America after the Second World War in response to the need for affordable homes for the growing towns and cities, and the returning service men and women. This home began life in 1952 and adhered to a Minimal Traditional architectural style.

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Historic Homes Feature: A Picture-Perfect Textbook American Ranch House

Historic Homes Feature: A Picture-Perfect Textbook American Ranch House

502 E Elizabeth is a classic Craftsman bungalow with clean, elegant lines. Built in 1924 by W. E. Bails, it passed through several owners, many professors at Colorado A & M (later Colorado State University), until the Cross family purchased it in 1936.

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Historic Homes Feature: A Classic Bungalow With Modern Twists

Historic Homes Feature: A Classic Bungalow With Modern Twists

502 E Elizabeth is a classic Craftsman bungalow with clean, elegant lines. Built in 1924 by W. E. Bails, it passed through several owners, many professors at Colorado A & M (later Colorado State University), until the Cross family purchased it in 1936.

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Historic Homes Feature: A Cozy and Elegant Turn of the Century Craftsman

Historic Homes Feature: A Cozy and Elegant Turn of the Century Craftsman

Jim Dennison’s one-story painted brick Craftsman home at 1100 West Oak Street provides a wonderful example of the small but elegant turn-of-the-century houses common to Oak Street. As with most houses, it blends several styles. It has a Craftsman shape with a front gable and deep soffits but no rafter tails. The round window, leaded pane glass on the porch, and bow window are more Victorian.

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Historic Homes Feature: A Labor of Love for a Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Hybrid

Historic Homes Feature: A Labor of Love for a Colonial Revival/Queen Anne Hybrid

Professor Clarence P. Gillette took up his post as Colorado Agricultural College’s first entomologist in 1891. In 1905, he and his wife Clara began construction on this beautiful home here on Elizabeth St, where they lived with their two daughters, Florence and Esther. In 1905, building styles were evolving from Victorian to early twentieth century styles. This home features predominantly Colonial Revival elements such as the low-pitched roof, asymmetrical yet balanced front facade, centered front door with front door sidelights, and bay and grouped double-hung windows.

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Historic Homes Feature: Opening Up a Minimal Traditional Classic

 Historic Homes Feature: Opening Up a Minimal Traditional Classic

Built in 1907, the Dura & Neil Graham House is an eclectic bungalow, incorporating elements of the Shingle Style, with strong Italianate, Craftsman, and Prairie influences. The rusticated sandstone foundation, typical of many Fort Collins homes built prior to the Great War, fits nicely into the aesthetic of the Shingle Style.

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Historic Homes Feature: Charming Eclectic Bungalow Built in 1907

Historic Homes Feature: Charming Eclectic Bungalow Built in 1907

Built in 1907, the Dura & Neil Graham House is an eclectic bungalow, incorporating elements of the Shingle Style, with strong Italianate, Craftsman, and Prairie influences. The rusticated sandstone foundation, typical of many Fort Collins homes built prior to the Great War, fits nicely into the aesthetic of the Shingle Style.

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Avery House Rose Garden Expands to Memorialize Influential Volunteers

Avery House Rose Garden Expands to Memorialize Influential Volunteers

The Avery rose garden is receiving a much-needed upgrade, thanks to community partners Vaught Frye Larson Architects and Ripley Design Landscape Architects, with assistance from United Way’s Make a Difference Day program.

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Historic Homes Feature: Cozy Craftsman Cottage built in 1920

Historic Homes Feature: Cozy Craftsman Cottage built in 1920

This compact house was built with simplicity and practicality. It is a side-gabled house with a shed dormer. It sits on a small lot created from the larger lots facing Mountain Avenue and Oak Street. This home was built in 1920, as listed on the 1948 tax assessor form. Unfortunately, both the county tax books and the City of Fort Collins directories are missing for 1920, leaving the name of the original owner lost to history.

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