The Avery House Story

 The Avery House today

The Avery House today

The Avery House story begins in early 1970. A stone cottage home on iconic Mountain Avenue was nearly a century old and slated to be torn down. Its story followed that of Franklin Avery – an essential figure in Fort Collins history, as he originally surveyed Fort Collins streets, founded what became First National Bank and built the iconic Avery Block building which is now part of Old Town Square. Surely, our community couldn’t let the Avery story be lost to time.

 Avery House during dedication ceremony in the 1970s. Courtesy Fort Collins History Connection Archives

Avery House during dedication ceremony in the 1970s. Courtesy Fort Collins History Connection Archives

The cottage had been passed down through Franklin Avery's family and found itself without tenants when his son, Edgar, passed away in 1962 and the home became a rental. This brings us to the biggest question of 1974: what would be the fate of the Avery House?

In comes Fort Collins community member, wife of the mayor: June Bennett. She rallied the troops, got all the movers and shakers in the town together and said ‘No, we’re not going to let the Avery House be torn down!’ The Poudre Landmarks Foundation was born. The City of Fort Collins purchased the home. Poudre Landmarks stepped in to restore, renovate and manage the home, with hopes to share it and the stories behind it for generations to come. 

The avery house today

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Today, the Avery House sees over 1,000 elementary school students who learn about life in Fort Collins in the early 20th century and see toys that young Edward Avery played with. Today, the Avery House sees thousands of visitors each year hosted by docents dressed to the nines in historic-style costume, and holds exhibits showcasing historic artifacts Poudre Landmarks maintains. 

Today, the spirit of preservation & education continues on thanks to volunteerism and financial support from community members.

Consider supporting us to help continue preservation and tours at the Avery House.